How To Tie Dye

Take 2 fashion designers in lockdown and give them something a little creative to do to past the time and what do you get; hello Tie Dye! Strangely when lockdown started we both reached for tie dye without the others knowledge as something to do with our kids and also something to entertain our creative brains. Tie dye is a big Spring/Summer trend after bubbling away since last year but this Summer it’s going to be huge. If you are like us and fancy giving it a go yourself then we thought we’d share the dye we used, how we went about it and anything we learnt to pass on to you guys!

 

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

 

 

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

Having not tie-dyed for years {potentially since we were both at The London College of Fashion studying textiles and womenswear design} a spot of YouTube browsing was in order to familiarise ourselves with the process. Alice chose to use a natural dye for a monotone colour and Hannah a home mixing dye kit to create a multicoloured look and once we’d given it a go we thought it would hopefully be helpful to share some tips that we learnt along the way…
First up; make sure your garment or fabric is a natural fabric {like cotton or linen} and that it is damp. The dye penetrates through the fabric so much better than dry fabric so dampen whatever you are tie dying before you start!
Next up; if you are after the pastel shades that we were looking for then dilute your dye. The bottles in the kit we bought are for those wanting strong vivid shades whereas if you are like us and want the more washed out look then we’d suggest taking some of the dye out or transferring to a bigger bottle to add more water to get a more subtle shade.
To test the dye colour you have mixed, squeeze a spot of the colour onto some kitchen roll or test fabric before dispensing onto the actual item of clothing. You don’t want a massive shock with the colour as once you’ve squeezed it on, its very tricky to remove! Better to be safe than sorry and test out the dye shades, even if a tiny bit, before you start!

 

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

  How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

The dyes instructions suggest leaving your garment for 4-8 hours once you have added the dye but again if you are looking for the washed out pastel look like us, then we suggest leaving the dye on the garment for a shorter time before you rinse it out. As you can see from the wet dyed pieces to the final dyed items they are much more subtle and less vivid as the colours weren’t left on too long and so they washed out. Bare this in mind with the shades you are adding and the length of time it’s on the garment.
If you want more all over colourful pieces make sure you get the dye into the crevices of the garment. Less dye means more white will remain but if you want a more bright colourful look make sure you are getting into all the nooks and crannies of your tied up bundle.
Don’t forget the back! The back aswell we the front is going to be dyed so once your garment is banded up don’t forget to turn it over to disperse colour through the back side of the garment!

 

 

 

*These are the dyes we bought.

 

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

*you can see how these shades washed out to a more muted palette once rinsed and washed in the machine.

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

 

If you fancy using natural dyes {that you may already have in your fridge or kitchen cupboard!} then YouTube the most potent vegetables that produce the most vivid colours but Alice used red cabbage to dye her tank top a subtle shade of purple. If using a vegetable dye we’d suggest chopping it finely before popping in a pan and covering with water, enough water that it is covered but not floating too much that way you get a stronger more vivid colour. Boil it then cool before using as your tie dye!

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

*here are the results!

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

How to do diy tie dye yourself homemade sweatshirt hoody pastel colours

There are a few different techniques such as the spiral or scrunched up which produce different end looks, all of which are surprisingly easy and should be listed in your dye instructions or readily available on YouTube. We used both and have to say the the spiral is our favourite for that classic tie dye look! As you can see we mainly used white tops to dye but anything thats mainly cotton will dye so how about trying a cotton dress or pair of joggers? Here are some base products that all will work on your home DIY project!

 

 

 

 

 

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Take care everyone and stay safe!

 

*PS. if you need a bit of inspo or just fancy buying something rather than a DIY job here are some gorgeous pieces to shop!

 

 

 

 

 

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